Dating fender amps chassis

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These amps caught on straight away, and in 1948 Fender released the Champ, which became the most popular amplifier they built.

The stage was set for rock'n'roll, and most guitarists from the early days of rock used Fener amps, whether they played a Fender guitar or not: Scotty Moore (Elvis) had a 1952 Deluxe; Cliff Gallup (Gene Vincent) also had a Deluxe; Buddy Holly had a TV-front Pro and a Bassman combo; and Chuck Berry is thought to have used a Bassman in the Fifties (pics and info are sketchy, but later on Berry would use a Fender Pro, and then go on to demand two Dual Showman Fenders as his main amp at gigs - a setup he kept for over 30 years!

Firstly, even though there's no doubt that Fender amps were (as indeed still are) extremely well-made, older amps are bound to cause more problems than new ones - and without being covered by warranty!

You'll see some big names such as Keith Richards, Joe Bonamassa or The Edge using vintage Fender amps onstage - but they can afford to, and it's no big deal to them.

But for the serious, working musician who plays regular gigs or records often, it wouldn't be such a great idea.

The Fender musical revolution started before the birth of rock music, just after the end of WW2.

Since his early teens Leo Fender had an interest in electronics, and when he grew up, Leo made a career for himself fixing and building PA systems for musicians, opening his own shop in California.

The list of illustrious British Fender users continues with Keith Richards (Dual Showman in the Sixties, Twin Amp now); Jimmy Page (Dual Showman in The Yardbirds), Pete Townshend (Bassman, Pro, Bandmaster and others); Marc Bolan (Dual Showman) and many others - so many, in fact, that it's almost pointless to try to create a comprehensive list of famous Fender amp users!

We'll just conclude this section by saying that, just like Fender amps have defined the rock'n'roll sounds of the Fifties and Sixties, they've carried on doing the same into the 21st Century: the Arctic Monkeys used a tiny, vintage Fender Champ to record most of the overdriven guitar sounds on their influential debut album; Jack White used a Fender Twin Reverb in the White Stripes, and The Strokes helped to popularize the modern Hot Rod Deville series, which is now a true staple in the setup of many indie bands.

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